Staging Tips for Spring

Staging Tips for Spring    by  HGTV

Brighten up your home and bring in buyers with these easy ideas.
Related To:
Springtime brings sunshine, showers — and plenty of opportunities for home staging. Make the most of the season with these fresh updates that are sure to attract buyers.
Whip your yard into shape. When you’re selling in the spring, you need to get your yard in shape as quickly as possible. Clear winter yard debris, and get frost-resistant plants that won’t be affected if a late cold spell hits. Or, invest in silk flowers for a touch of color that you don’t have to worry about watering.
Do some spring cleaning. It’s natural to want to spruce up your space in the spring, so scrub away! A sparkling home will impress buyers and make your home seem even more appealing.
Box up your winter wardrobe. Bulky winter clothes take up lots of space, so move them out as you de-clutter your closets. You’ll impress buyers with all that space.
Spruce up the entryway. If your welcome mat is covered with winter dirt, pick up a new one. A clean, pretty doorway will help set the tone for the entire showing.
Bring spring aromas indoors. Spring is not only a colorful season, but a fragrant one, too. Bring the aroma indoors. Scents have a profound effect on mood, so infusing scent into your decor with diffusers, candles, fresh cut plants/flowers, or incense can change the overall feeling of a space.
Bring out the bright colors. Tuck away the heavy, winter flannel comforter and pull out crisp linens with coverlets for color. Bring in the spring with floral-designed spreads or colorful solids. Don’t forget accent pillows for added style and comfort.Click below for more great tips for your home by HGTVhttp://www.hgtv.com/design/real-estate/staging-tips-for-spring

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This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on March 24,2017.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for a great team of local realtors.

T.U.R.F., Inc.

Old Rochester Regional High School FootballWhat is T.U.R.F., Inc. all about?   Tri-Town Unified Recreational Facilities (T.U.R.F., Inc.) is a citizen-based non-profit organization, formed to fulfill the vision of a first-class facility at Old Rochester Regional High School.

The fields and facilities at Old Rochester Regional High School are the common ground of the Tri-Town area.  Every day brings a diverse group of students and community members together to run the track, hop on the tennis courts, or join their teams on the playing fields.  Each year thousands of friends, neighbors and teammates cross paths and strengthen connections.  The fields at the high school have not been upgraded since the school’s 2000 addition, and the facility is showing its age.

T.U.R.F., Inc. would like to transform ORRHS fields into a premiere facility for the tri-towns to use.  This would include:

  •  The installation of synthetic turf playing fields;
  •  The redevelopment of track & tennis facilities;
  • The rebuilding of grass baseball fields.

 

This complex will bring our athletic programs to the next level, creating more opportunities for our youth and recreational programs, and expand opportunities for adult athletic and civic programs.

Studies have shown that areas with modern recreational areas see a property value increase of 17% or more, and areas with poorly maintained rec areas see their property values decrease.

The Committee is looking for  your help, no matter how big or small.  They usually meet on the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm in the ORR High School Media Center, but you can also check out their Facebook page and  website page “Come To Our Next Meeting.”

T.U.R.F., Inc.

Click on the links below to visit their website with lots of information on progress made and the days ahead.  Attend a meeting and see how you can help or make a donation.  It will make for a better community.

Visit www.orrturf.com for more information and a link for donations.  Check out their facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/orrturf/?fref=ts

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more updates and the latest news.  We have a great team of realtors who care about the community they live and work in.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on February 8, 2017.

Thanksgiving in the Tri-Town

ThanksgivingThanksgiving in the Tri-town of Marion, Mattapoisett and Rochester is almost here.  Here are some local events.

The Marion Council on Aging has tickets available to the yearly Old Rochester Regional Thanksgiving dinner. The event will be held on Nov. 23. The doors open at 11:15 a.m. and students serve dinner at noon. Call the Council on Aging at 508-748-3570 if you need a ride. Meals will be delivered to homebound elders.

6th Annual Guard Oil Turkey Trot 5K

This 5K is on a fairly flat course along Sippican Harbor. This is a timed event, and results are available for all runners. All runners will receive a complimentary T-shirt, and top finishers in each age group will receive medals. Register prior to Nov. 19 for $18 online at www.marionrecreation.com or register in-person the day of race for $20. The race begins at 10:15 a.m. It starts and finishes at Tabor Academy.

Open Skate at Tabor Academy

Grab your ice skates and take a turn on the rink during open public skating at Tabor Academy. Cost is $5 per skater or you may purchase an individual season pass for the discounted rate of $45. Visit www.marionrecreation.com for more information.

Event Dates

Fall Landscaping Maintenance Tips

Landscape Maintenance Tips for the Fall Season

fall landscapeFall.  When the morning air turns crisp and cool and the leaves begin to float softly to the ground.  Not only is it my favorite season, there are many maintenance tasks to be accomplished in the landscape.  The info below includes tips on what I have found are the most important and useful tasks-  so get out there, have fun with it, and enjoy the autumn weather!

Key Dates

  • Early October:  It is a good idea to winterize your irrigation system and blow out the lines.  Many landscape maintenance companies will provide this service for less than $50, or it is pretty simple to do it yourself.
  • October 15th:  Don’t plant any grasses or perennials after this date.  Many of them won’t survive, and you will have much better luck in the spring.
  • November 1st:  Don’t plant any evergreens (especially trees) after this date.  Some deciduous trees and large deciduous shrubs can be planted later if they are balled and burlapped (B&B), but I would recommend waiting until spring when you’ll have much better success.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Prune trees and shrubs to remove dead branches or to control their size.  Fall is the best time to do this for the health of the plants.  Consider consulting with an arborist before any major pruning on trees, or at least do a little research on techniques.  When pruning shrubs, always try to maintain the natural size and growth habit of the species-  Avoid over-pruning or sculpting unnatural shapes, unless you are creating a specific look such as a hedge.  Instead of using power shears to lap off shrubs on a straight line, consider using hand pruners to thin the interior branches to maintain a healthier more natural look.
  • Remember to check soil moisture, and water if needed.  Even though you may have your irrigation system shut down for the year, fall often brings some warm, windy days that can really dry things out.  Pay special attention to anything that was just planted this year.
  • Make sure you have plenty of mulch around trees and shrubs-  this helps maintain moisture and keeps the soil from drying out over the winter.

Perennials and Ornamental Grasses

  • Prepare tender and semi-hardy perennials and shrubs for the upcoming cold winter.  I like to let a few of the fallen leaves that tend to build up around the bases of these plants remain there for the winter-  they will provide insulation around the base of the plant from the cold.  This also saves you some leaf cleanup now that you can do in the early spring.  If necessary, place additional wood mulch around the base of these plants for more insulation- pay particular attention to areas with northern exposure.
  • Leave spent stems and seed heads on grasses and perennials until spring, to enjoy their winter beauty and to provide cover for birds and wildlife.  Or, if you must have a neater look you can cut them back now, to a height of about 6-8″ off of the ground.
  • Dividing:  Some plants can be divided in the fall and replanted in other areas.  Other species don’t like the fall division/planting though, and I think that spring is a much better time to do it.  If you decide to divide, remember to water the plants well for a couple of weeks.

Lawns

  • Rake those leaves!  If left on the lawn they can smother it and cause issues such as mold and fungus.
  • Consider aerating your lawn.  Aeration allows greater movement of water, fertilizer, and air which stimulates healthy turf.  Aerating also increases the speed of decomposition of the grass clippings and enhances deep root growth.  Compacted soil especially benefits from core aerating.
  • You may want to fertilize your lawn or use a “weed and feed” type light pre-emergent herbicide in the fall for maximum growth the following spring.  Don’t over do it though, because fertilizer and herbicide can wash off of your lawn and the runoff can be harmful to water supplies and wildlife.
  • Assess the size and configuration of your lawn, and how much water you used this year to keep it green (or, brown?).   Consult with a landscape architect about how you can redesign your landscape to make it more attractive, sustainable, and functional.

Fall Weather Considerations

  • The days are getting shorter and the weather is getting cooler.  Keep an eye on the amount of precipitation we are getting-  Fall can have extremes of hot and cold, dry and wet.  Be observant.  If you have heavy rain for a couple of days then turn off the sprinklers for a week or so to compensate.  And if you have several days of warm, sunny weather then your landscape will certainly appreciate an extra drink.

Other

  • Disconnect and drain hoses, but keep a hose handy for winter watering.  I also like to wrap insulation or put insulated covers over the exterior faucets as an added protection from freeze damage (I once had a pipe freeze and break UNDER my porch, and had to take apart the porch to fix it!).
  • Collecting seed:  Stop deadheading late in the year and allow the seedheads to dry on the plant.  Then you can collect the dried seeds to plant next spring.  Store them in a cool, dark place in a container that does NOT have an airtight seal, such as an envelope (it’s also a good idea to label the container so you remember what plant it is next spring).  Another option- leave the seeds on the plants and some perennials will re-seed themselves naturally.
  • Start planning your spring bulb garden now.  Spring-blooming bulbs are planted in the fall to provide the chilling time required for spring blooms.  Remember to prepare the soil and plant bulbs at the appropriate depth listed on the package for the species.
  • Start planning for design changes to your landscape for next year.  Fall and winter are the best times to get your plans in order, and spring is the best time to install the changes-  so get ready early for next spring, because it will be here before you know it!
  • Take a break and toss the football around.  Afterward, enjoy some warm apple cider with cinnamon.  Finally, rake your leaves into a giant pile and take turns jumping into them with the neighbor kids!

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for all your real estate needs.  We have our own home stager, Laura Severino, who can help stage your home and help your house sell faster.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on September 21, 2016.

Walk to End Alzheimer’s

The end of Alzheimer's starts with you
Walk to End Alzheimer's - Alzheimer's Association
I use email to share my story of losing my wife to Alzheimer's. In each of my three mailings to more than 300 people, I stress that Walk to End Alzheimer's is getting closer and ask for support. —Donald B., Team Captain, Grand Champions Club Member & Top Fundraiser

About Walk to End Alzheimer’s

Held annually in more than 600 communities nationwide, the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s® is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. This inspiring event calls on participants of all ages and abilities to reclaim the future for millions!

When you participate in Walk, your fundraising dollars fuel our mission, and your participation in the event helps to change the level of Alzheimer’s awareness in your community. The Alzheimer’s Association provides free, easy-to-use tools and staff support to help participants reach their fundraising goal. While there is no fee to register, we encourage participants to fundraise in order to contribute to the cause and raise awareness.

The New Bedford Walk to End Alzheimer’4s will be held on Saturday, September 24, 2016 at Fort Taber, S. Rodney French Blvd., New Bedford, MA 02744

Registration is at 8:30 am

Ceremony is at 9:30 am

Walk begins at 10:00 am

Contact:
Marissa Bresnahan
617.868.6718
mbresnahan@alz.org

Dave Garro, one of the BOLDIES at BOLD Moves Real Estate will be participating in the walk and is encouraging others to join him.  As part of his fund raising efforts. BOLD Moves will be contributing as part of their Pay it Forward program.  Dave will be walking for John and Christine Gallagher.  John Gallagher has been diagnosed with Alzheimers.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com to meet our team of realtors who believe in Paying it forward.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on September 14, 2016.

Real Estate “Blooming”

lBOLD Moves Real Estate

The real estate market is “blooming” so to speak or booming as we normally think.  Despite the hot, humid weather and lack of rain, the real estate market is busy.  People are out looking and inventory is low, so houses are moving quickly.

Just like this sunflower beautifully blooming amid a dry, slow garden, your house can look like a standout in the neighborhood.

Consider having your home staged.  Stagers have great ideas to put your home in its best light.  They can give you ideas for projects to do yourself or they can do the staging, even bringing in or removing furniture to give your home a bright, airy feel.  Homes that are staged sell quicker with less days on the market.

On the outside, use your water wisely.  You want your landscaping to stay plush and green and your flowers colorful.  Water in the evening or early morning and consider soaker hoses.  Watering deeply at the roots is what they need.  Sprinklers sometimes can waste water if they are not set properly.  You don’t want to be watering your sidewalk or street.

It’s been a long, hot summer but with a little strategic planning, you can get your house on the market and ready to sell.  It’s a great time since interest rates are still low as well as inventory.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for all your real estate questions.  We offer our talented stager, Laura Severino to get your house market ready.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on August 18,2016

 

Real Estate Market Trends for Summer 2016

Real Estate Market Trends For Summer 2016

by MATTY BYLOOSJUNE 20, 2016

Real Estate Market Trends for Summer 2016

Another spring is over, another summer just begun. As we head into the warmest months of the year, the real estate market typically tends to cool a bit, following the hottest buying season of the year. But with everything that’s happened in the housing market over the last few years, 2016 may be anything by typical. So let’s take a look at what may be in store for this summer.
real estate market trends 2016

Lack of Available Homes to Purchase Likely to Remain an Issue

As the rental market has continued to heat up over the last few years, a general lack of inventory has slowed sales in many markets nationwide. This has been a primary driver of prices post-crisis, but with prices likely to “normalize” or at least slow their steady climb over the course of the summer, lack of inventory may be less of an issue than it has been recently.

Trouble With Financing for Younger Buyers Likely to Remain an Issue

Millennials, the second largest generation in the history of the United States and the largest living generation, are still having a difficult time making it into the market. Despite their expressed desire to own their own homes, many younger buyers are having trouble getting the funds together to meet the current down payment requirements for financing a home.

This is primarily due to a combination of massive student loan debt, rising rents, and stagnant wages. The federal government may ease some financing restrictions put in place following the recession, but announcements have not been forthcoming.

real estate trends 2016

Rising Rents, Lack of Rental Inventory, and Stabilizing Home Prices

The rental market will most likely continue to heat up through the summer, making rental inventory an even greater issue as home prices continue to stabilize, following a period of significant growth. This will likely provide incentive for a great many buyers who may not otherwise have entered the market this summer.

However, mortgage rates are also expected to continue to climb. This will drive up debt-to-income ratios, especially in areas with the highest home prices, keeping some out of the market for credit issues mentioned above while driving others into the market looking to capitalize on lower rates than they will be able to get for what may be a very long time.

The Bigger Picture

So, what does it all mean? Despite, the challenges to many hoping to enter the market as buyers this year, rising rental rates coupled with moderate growth in home prices and rising mortgage rates should drive a busier than typical summer buying season. However, lack of available homes in some areas will present an issue to many buyers.

Visit www.homes.com

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more information on the real estate market and  great properties for sale.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on June 30, 2016.

 

 

Walls Up at Fieldstone Farm Market in Marion

Construction  of Fieldstone Farm Market is well underway.  The walls are going up as planned in preparation for a fall opening.  Fieldstone Farm Market, owned and operated by Arnie Johnson of Rochester will offer fresh fruits and vegetables as well as an ice cream window.  Stay tuned to our website for more updates as construction continues.  Arnie is very excited to be bringing a new, customer friendly market to Marion with local and fresh produce.

Fieldstone Farm MarketFieldstone Farm Market

 

Visit www.fieldstonefarmmarket.com for more updates as construction continues for a fall opening.

This blog was posted on www.fieldstonefarmmarket.com on June 21, 2016.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more local news in the neighborhoods we live and work in.

Six Landscaping Mistakes

 

landscaping6 Landscaping Mistakes That Will Destroy Your Yard
By
Jamie Wiebe

6:30 am ET
March 29, 2016

As warmer temps approach—quite slowly, depending on your part of the country—you might already be sweating your lawn. And with good reason: Good landscaping can add up to 28% to the overall value of a home.

But even for those blessed with the greenest of thumbs, landscaping offers plenty of potential for disaster: Do too little, and the effect won’t be noticeable. Too much, and everything might die. And introduce the wrong plant? Say goodbye to your entire yard. Scary!

Here are six big DIY landscaping pitfalls to avoid like a case of poison oak—straight from the pros!

1. Planting ‘mulch volcanoes’

Don’t stop there—flatten (loosely!) your mulch to avoid a volcano.
Don’t suffocate your newly planted trees with the dreaded “mulch volcanoes”—piles of the insulating organic matter that rise as high as a foot up the trunk, says central Virginia arborist Michael Rittenhouse Rigby.

Mulch is designed to control the soil temperature and keep it moisturized—but to do so properly, it must be applied loosely. Tight packing strangles the tree and softens the root collar, a nonwaterproof section of the tree’s trunk. The result: rot, invasive insects, and suffocated roots.

“Mulch mounds may look like the norm, but it’s a harmful practice,” Rigby says. Remember kids: Mulch mounds are not cool.

2. Choosing wrong or ‘dangerous’ plants

Feathery fountain grass can pose a fire hazard.
One of the biggest mistakes an amateur landscaper can make is choosing an invasive plant, which can quickly grow out of control.

The biggest offender? Bamboo—it’s almost impossible to control. Without your own giant panda to do the trimming, you’ll find your yard overrun with tall, tough stalks that take years to fully remove.

Other offenders? The plants often found in “drought-tolerant” sections of big-box nurseries, according to Cassy Aoyagi, the president of FormLA Landscaping in Tujunga, CA.

In particular, beware of Mexican feather grass, fountain grasses, and pampas grasses, which can be fire hazards due to their dry leaves and flowering stalks.

“Having this sort of foliage on slopes can be especially dangerous in an El Niño year,” Aoyagi says.

3. Poor planning

Just like your class photos, tall ones go to the back.
Before you even put your hands in the dirt, carefully work out a design on graph paper to understand your space requirements, advises landscaper John Crider of Crider Landscaping in Soddy Daisy, TN.

“Measurements are key,” Crider says. “Like a good carpenter, measure two times and cut once.”

For small areas, stick with flowering perennials and skip large shrubs. As a general rule, taller plants should go toward the back and smaller plants in front.

Once you know what size foliage can fit without overcrowding, research specific plants (Crider suggests using Pollinator Partnership) and sketch them into your design.

And even if it can fit, don’t plant too big—that’s a rookie mistake.

Large foliage might look impressive, but it has a hard time taking root. Small foliage grows nicely and has a better chance of survival.

4. Using too much gravel

This gravel’s too hot to handle.
With drought-tolerant landscaping, you can have too much of a good thing. Enter gravel, landscaping’s double-edged sword.

Gravel does save water. But it also reflects heat toward any plants nearby, damaging all but the hardiest plants. Any heat that gravel doesn’t reflect, it absorbs, essentially baking the roots of your plants.

And that’s to say nothing of future plantings: Gravel can get mixed into the underlying soil, making it too hard to absorb rainwater, Aoyagi says. And it’s nigh impossible to add more foliage to hard, dry soil—meaning you’ll be stuck with the plants you already have.

5. Installing artificial grass improperly

Fake grass can still give you some real problems.
Sometimes the grass really is greener on the other side. But only if you install it correctly.
There’s nothing wrong with choosing fake grass over the real stuff, especially if you live in a drought-ridden region. Today’s artificial turf is almost indistinguishable from a live, lush lawn, minus the upkeep.

They key is to make sure you’re installing it correctly—not just plopping it on top of your dirt. You’ll want to consult an expert, but generally, you should excavate 3 inches below the finished grade and install a sub-base, according to Chad Vander Veen, marketing and communications manager for Purchase Green Artificial Grass.

Because native soil expands and contracts depending on its water content, it can create “wrinkles, dimples, or soft spots, and a very uneven surface,” Vander Veen says. A sub-base “will ensure an artificial grass installation will continue to look good for the duration of its 15- to 20-year life.”

If you’re using multiple pieces of turf, you’ll want to make sure they’re properly seamed. Discuss the best way to lay your turf with your supplier, who can help you create a clean, unnoticeable line.

6. Building out near trees

Damage to tree roots could creep up on you. Get it?
Thinking of adding an in-law suite? Or perhaps you want to make your garage into a man cave. We’re all for it. But if your yard features large trees, you’ll need to protect them before embarking on any construction that might touch the roots.

You might not see the dire effects of damaged roots for quite a while—until a storm causes the rotting trunk to come crashing onto your roof. Or, if you put your home on the market, that giant dying limb hanging over your daughter’s bedroom could knock thousands off any offer, Rigby says.

Hire a tree care specialist if you’re planning any construction projects in your yard. Experts can ensure your work doesn’t touch the delicate root system, which causes irreparable—and expensive—damage.

www.realtor.com

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more tips for your real estate clients.  Find out how you can be a real estate agent with Agent Rising Real Estate School.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on June 17, 2016.

 

Fieldstone Farm Market in Marion Update

Here is the latest update for Fieldstone Farm Market of Marion.  The foundation has been poured and Arne Johnson, owner, is hoping to see the walls start to go up next week.  There is lots of activity at the site of the former Frigate Restaurant on Rt. 6.

The fruit and vegetable market will have fresh produce with an emphasis on fresh and local.  Having worked in the local produce field for many years, Arne has lots of experience in bringing the best possible fruits and vegetables to the community.

There will also be an ice cream window with local flavors.  Look for the fall opening of Fieldstone Farm Market and more updates as construction continues.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com  and www.fieldstonefarmmarket.com for more updates as construction continues.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on June 1, 2016.

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