Landscaping and Watering

landscaping and wateringSummer is an especially important time to save water. Outdoor water use increases residential consumption from 10% to 50% in June, July and August.  This summer has been a particularly difficult year with significantly less than average rainfall and the need to water more frequently.  Every drop counts to keep your landscaping alive and flourishing.

TIMING IS CRITICAL!

Watering your lawn mid-day will result in a high rate of evaporation and sunburned grass. Roots can maintain plenty of moisture even after several days without rain. Before watering, look for signs that it’s needed: patchy areas, a general change in color or footprints that remain in the grass long after being made.

Frequent light watering can actually weaken your lawn by encouraging shallow roots that are less tolerant of dry periods and more susceptible to insect damage. Wet grass can also burn in the hot sun and is vulnerable to disease from mildew and fungus. Test your soil for dryness by digging your finger below the surface of the soil. Water only when the soil is dry to a depth of 1 1/2 inches. When watering, check to see that water soaks down 3-4 inches. This encourages deep root growth.

GIVE YOUR LAWN A REST

If your lawn “fades” in the summer, don’t panic. Grass becomes naturally dormant during hot, dry periods. It will revive quickly after a good rainfall or when the weather turns cooler.

  • Water very early in the morning.
  • Never water when it’s windy, rainy or very hot.
  • Raise the blade level of your mower to 2 -3 inches or more. Longer grass retains more moisture because it shades the roots. It encourages deeper rooting, requires less fertilizer and competes better against weeds.
  • Never water faster than the soil can absorb it. Avoid puddling and run-off.
  • Be sure your hose has a shut-off nozzle. Hoses without a nozzle can spout 10 gallons or more per minute.
  • If you have an automatic sprinkler system, make sure the timer or “controller” is set to water each landscape zone efficiently. Program the controller to operate according to the watering needs of your lawn or garden. Better still, install a rain sensor or soil moisture sensor that turns the system off if it’s raining or if moisture is present in the soil.
  • Do not apply fertilizer in the summer – new growth requires more water. Apply in early spring and or fall.
  • Aerate your soil in April, September or October to aid water absorption and retention.

PLAN AND DESIGN YOUR GARDEN FOR EFFICIENT WATERING

Be aware of the various zones in your yard (hot/sunny, cool/shady, moist, dry, etc.) and plan your gardens and plantings accordingly. For example, if your have a hot, dry zone, carefully select plants that can endure hot, dry conditions.

CLUSTER PLANTS THAT NEED EXTRA CARE

If you choose shrubs, flowers or vegetables that need lots of sun and moisture, place them near each other. You’ll save time and water by watering just one area of your yard.

MULCH TO KEEP ROOTS MOIST

Mulch can serve as a ground cover that reduces water evaporation from the soil and reduces the number of weeds that would otherwise compete with the plant for available soil moisture.

Mulch flowers, shrub beds and trees with pine bark mulch. In your vegetable beds, use salt marsh hay, newspaper (no color pages), black plastic, or better yet, landscape fabric – that allows water to penetrate the fabric but keeps down weed growth. On a sweltering 100° day, a 3-inch mulch can keep the soil underneath up to 25° cooler! Avoid white marble chips that can damage acid-loving plants like rhododendrons. Stones or pebbles are good on shady areas. They shouldn’t be used near the house because they give off too much heat. Ground covers, such as ivy or pachysandra, also prevent evaporation around established shrubs and ornamental trees

.You can’t control the weather but you can do  your part to make the most of the water available to help keep your  landscaping alive.

Visit www.agentrising.com for more useful tips to pass on to your real estate clients or to start your real estate career with Agent Rising Real Estate School.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on August 12, 2016.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com  for great real estate in your community.

Tour de Creme

Tour de Creme

Mattapoisett Tour de Crème

The Tour de Creme was held yesterday, Sunday, May 22nd in Mattapoisett. Not just a bike ride, the Tour de Crème is 3 pedal-powered tours of SouthCoast creameries and a seaside party. It’s a biking and ice cream extravaganza!   The Mattapoisett Land Trust and the Friends of the Mattapoisett Bike Path bring you the Tour de Crème, a fundraising event combining SouthCoast’s fabulous cycling with a selection of the best ice cream shops along the route. 

The event included 13, 25, and 48-mile routes on scenic country roads and the Mattapoisett-Fairhaven Bike Path.  There is a ride for everyone and cyclists were invited to stop at local creameries along the way to try their ice cream.

The ice cream stops included Captain Bonney’s in Rochester, Country Whip  and Acushnet Creamery in Acushnet, The Slip and Oxford Creamery in Mattapoisett, to name a few.

BOLD Moves Real Estate of Mattapoisett was there. BOLDIES Tracey Lee, Iva Lajoie and Susan Gorden Ryan were on hand to help out at the end and had a great time.  The rain held off and it turned out to be a great day.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more local news.  Our agents live and work in the communities they serve and enjoy lending a hand in their neighborhoods.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com May 23, 2016.

Draft Horses!

draft horses, equestrian propertiesDraft horses, they are the gentle giants built to work.  A draft horse is a large horse bred to be a working animal doing hard tasks such as plowing and other farm labor.  There are a number of different breeds of draft horses with varying characteristics but all share the common traits of strength, patience and a docile temperment.  They were invaluable to past generations of farmers and loggers.

Today, draft horses can serve a number of functions, such as farming, logging, maple syrup production, and recreation.  They are also commonly used for breeding to lighter riding breeds such as the thoroughbred for sport horses.  Most draft horses are used for driving but they are also great riding horses due to their gently nature.

Draft horses are generally taller and have an extremely muscular build.  They tend to have broad, short backs with powerful hindquarters best suited for pulling. Draft breeds range from 16 to 19 hands high and from 1,400 to 2,000 pounds.  They are costly to feed because of their size, but do well on good quality grass.

There are many breeds of Draft horses.  Belgians are the most popular breed of draft horses.  They are big, strong, kind-natured and beautiful.  Some other breeds include:  American Creams, Brabants, Clydesdales which we all know from the Budweiser franchise, Percherons who are generally black or grey, Suffolk Punch, Shires, and Halflingers to name a few.

They are truly beautiful, gentle giants in the horse world and very loyal animals to own.

Visit www.equestrian-properties.com or www.boldmovesrealestate.com for horsing news and great equestrian properties.

This blog was posted on www.equestrian-properties.com on July 30, 2015