Winter is Best Time to Sell

winterWinter Is Best Time to Sell, Study Shows

The housing market doesn’t hibernate in the winter. Sellers who list and buyers who buy often find the winter season the most advantageous time to make a move in real estate, according to a new study by the real estate brokerage Redfin. The winter season officially takes place between Dec. 21 and March 20, and real estate professionals should be ready for a season that often brings in more focused and active sellers and buyers.

Winter Sales

In an update to a two-year analysis it completed last year, Redfin researchers studied nationwide home listings, sales prices, and time-on-market data from 2010 through October 2014.

The study found that February is “historically the best month to list, with an average of 66 percent of homes listed then selling within 90 days,” according to Redfin’s research.

Even in cold weather cities – such as Boston and Chicago – researchers found that home sellers were better off listing their homes in the winter than during other seasons.

The winter tends to net sellers’ more than their asking price during the months of December, January, February, and March than listings from June through November. Listing during those four winter months has resulted in higher percentages of above-asking-price sales than listing during any months, other than April and May.

Redfin researchers found that in 2012 December listings were producing the highest percentage of above-asking sales for the entire year at 17 percent.

Researchers say the winter market is less competitive for sellers since many people tend to wait until the spring to list. The smaller inventory of active listings help sellers get more attention from buyers on their properties. Also, many large corporations often transfer employees or hire new ones early in the year, creating opportunities for winter sellers from very motivated purchasers.

Homes that are “priced right and show well can sell any time” of the year, says Nela Richardson, chief economist for Redfin. Winter buyers tend to be “serious buyers… Most people are not window-shopping” in December and January, like they do in the spring months, Richardson adds.

Sellers shouldn’t worry about the holidays hampering their chances either. A 2011 study conducted by realtor.com® found that 60 percent of real estate professionals advise their sellers to list a home during the holidays because they believe it’s an opportune time to sell. Nearly 80 percent of the real estate professionals surveyed said that more serious buyers emerge during the holidays, and 61 percent say less competition from other properties makes it an ideal time to sell.

As for buyers, they may find winter a good time to make a move too. Sellers often are more flexible about negotiations over prices and terms than they would in the spring, real estate professionals say.

“People get more realistic at this time of year,” particularly if their homes hadn’t sold during the summer and fall, says Mary Bayat, a broker in Washington, D.C., and chairwoman-elect of the Northern Virginia Association of REALTORS®.

Source: “Best Time to List a Home for Sale? Winter, Redfin Says,” Los Angeles Times (Dec. 14, 2014)

http://realtormag.realtor.org/

Real estate is what we do.  Visit www.agentrising.com for your guide to becoming a real estate agent and defining your brand.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on Jan. 6, 2017.

Buying a Home at the Holidays

 

Top 5 Reasons To Buy A Home During The Holidays

Why it Makes Sense to Buy a Home at Year’s End

Top 5 Reasons To Buy A Home During The Holidays

November 30, 2016 Few people like to uproot their family and go through the stresses of home buying and moving during the holidays, but for those who do not mind, the holiday season may provide home buying bargains. Here are a few of the reasons why.

    • Less Market Activity – Lots of family, school, and work activities, combined with the weather in many locations, lead to fewer real estate transactions over the holidays. Since fewer people overall are looking to buy houses, you will have less competition for your preferred house – and this gives you leverage.Holiday home sellers often have to adjust their price downward or make other concessions if they want to sell. Keep this in mind as you search for homes. Bargains may be available, and listed prices may be more open to negotiation.
  • Motivated Sellers – People who are selling their homes over the holidays often have great incentive to sell, such as an upcoming job relocation. If a house has already been on the market for some time, that incentive is multiplied.You may be able to use this urgency to your advantage (assuming you are not in a similarly urgent need to buy). Negotiate fairly but firmly with sellers and you should be able to extract a lower price and/or other concessions like paying part of the closing costs.

Potential Tax Advantages – If you itemize your taxes, you can deduct any points you paid upon closing, as well as property taxes and mortgage interest. Whether it is to your advantage to buy before or after year’s end depends on factors such as how many other deductions you have this year and expect to have next year.

It is best to consult with a tax professional before purchase. Even though you do not want to make a decision on a home purchase strictly for tax reasons, it could be to your benefit to close before the end of the year.

 

    • Better Interest Rates – Within the general trend of interest rates, there is often a cyclical trend of lower interest rates during the holidays – not from the generosity of lenders but due to limited demand forcing greater competition among lenders.There are plenty of factors that can obscure or swamp this cycle, but in general, you should see preferable interest rates around the holidays compared to the times immediately before or after.

 

  • Faster Closings – Generally, all parties involved have incentive to complete transactions toward the end of the year. Lenders want to close their books, real estate agents want to receive their commissions before the year closes, sellers want to move on to their new home and settle in for the holidays – and just like the sellers, you want to settle in as well.Since all parties are motivated and there are fewer transactions taking place during this time, it should be easier to put everything in place for a smooth and rapid closing.

These factors do not always apply. For example, if you are trying to buy a home in a winter ski resort area or similar high-demand winter destination, these dynamics may be reversed – except for the tax implications. However, for the majority of Americans, the holidays represent an opportunity to buy a home under mostly favorable economic conditions.

The weather may still be frightful, but your opportunities to buy a home around the holidays may be just as delightful. Enjoy the holiday season as you explore your options. Don’t forget to give Santa your new forwarding address!

www.moneytips.com

 

Photo ©iStockphoto.com/vgajic

Visit www.agentrising.com for Agent Rising Real Estate School and see how you can begin your real estate career.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for a great team of realtors to help you with all your real estate needs.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on December 15, 2016.

Staging Tips for Selling During the Holidays

Staging Tips for Selling During the Holidays

Before you deck the halls, see which holiday decor can help you sell.

Brian Patrick Flynn

By: Kara Wahlgren
Related To:
It’s the time of year that calendars are packed with holiday parties, budgets are strained by gift-giving and the roads are covered in freshly fallen snow. Alas, ’tis not the season for real estate. But the good news is that the few brave house-hunters who do venture out are serious about buying a house and stylish trimmings will make them want to ring in the new year in your home.
“Holidays can be personal on a lot of levels, but you want to make sure your decor is neutral,” advises Amy Powers, owner of Accent Home Staging & Interiors of Atlanta. “You want to romance your buyer, not invite them to your Christmas party.”
Try these tips to get buyers in the right spirit:
  • Clean and stage. “Before you decorate, your house needs to be staged,” Powers says. If your living room is already piled high with clutter and tchotchkes, your ceramic reindeer collection is only going to add to the sense of overcrowding.
  • Create a cozy vibe. The less-is-more mantra of home staging may tempt you to forgo holiday cheer this year. But a few subtle touches like a bowl of pinecones, an evergreen wreath, or a pot of cider simmering on the stove can create a warm and festive feeling in your home.
  • Complement your palette. Before you start untangling your tinsel, make sure your holiday collection matches your current decor. If your living room is painted a soothing ocean-blue hue, skip the clashing red garland and opt for white snowflakes or a silver glass-ball wreath. If you’ve got an earthy color scheme, accent with rich tones like cranberries, forest greens and gold.
  • Accentuate the positive. Too many trimmings may distract buyers, but the right accessories can draw attention to your home’s best features. Dangle mistletoe in an arched doorway, or display your menorah on the ledge of a bay window; just don’t block a beautiful view with stick-on snowflake decals or clutter an elegant fireplace with personalized stockings.
  • Go light on lights. Step away from the inflatable snowman, Clark Griswold. One man’s “merry” is another man’s “tacky,” so tone down any garish light displays while your home is on the market. (No, your neighbors didn’t pay us to say that.) Instead, use simple string lighting to play up your home’s architecture or draw attention to the gorgeous fir tree in your front yard.
  • Be an equal-opportunity decorator. Leave the life-sized Nativity scene in storage this year, because overtly religious flourishes may be off-putting to some buyers. “You want to keep neutrality throughout, so you can attract any type of buyer,” Powers says. Not sure what qualifies? Powers adds, “No matter what your religion is, you’re not going to feel offended by a nutcracker.”
  • Mind the tree. A tall Christmas tree can help you show off your two-story great room, but make sure the wide base won’t overwhelm the floor space. If your living area is on the small side, save space with a skinny tree. Swap the gaudy heirloom ornaments and trim your tree in a cohesive theme such as icicle lights and silver tinsel, for example, or blue and gold glass balls.
  • Clear the clutter. A few decorations can stir the holiday spirit, but don’t feel obliged to hang every last ornament. “A lot of people, when they decorate, tend to use all the extra space in their house,” Powers says. “You still want each space to look as spacious as possible.” Limit yourself to a few hints of holiday flair, but stash the rest in the basement for now. If you start to miss your Santa figurines, just remember that with a little luck, you’ll be celebrating next year’s holidays in a new home. And you can decorate that place any way you please.
  • Staging is an important part of selling your home.  Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com  We are able to offer Laura Severino as our premiere stager.  See how staging can change your home’s days on the market!
  • This blog was posted on November 30, 2016 on www.boldmovesrealestate.com

BOLD Moves Real Estate at MAR Conference and Expo

MAR Conferenceimg_4394-1

The MAR 2016 Conference and Tradeshow was held October 5 & 6 at the Foxwoods Casino in Connecticut.  BOLD Moves Real Estate was in attendance.

Broker owner Kate Lanagan MacGregor of BOLD Moves along with Linda Kody  presented  “Seller Agency for Today and Tomorrow:  Coming Soon Upstream to a Pocket Near You”.

This was a great educational opportunity. This evolving continuing education class incorporatedMLSPIN guidelines, the Code of Ethics, and NAR’s Upstream initiatives into practicing real estate today.  Some of the topics included how to appropriately handle “coming soon” and exclusive listings.

Kate was excited to work with Kathy Condon and John Breault from MLSPIN and their expertise as well as Veronica McManus from RPR and Alex Lang- CEO of Upstream.  They really  provided her with a wealth of knowledge in their areas of expertise.

Many of the BOLDIES Realtors were also in attendance including Sonia Amaral, Betty Tripanier, Dawn Devlin,  Laura Severino, Kathy Song, Dave Garro and Paula Tosca as well as Marie Greany from BBM.

Dave was happy to attend.  He felt it is always helpful to get together with other realtors and exchange strategies and learning experiences.

Paula attended a class on” selling the seller”. Her takeaway was,  It’s always important to be confident and make a connection with your seller.

It was a great, educational as well as fun event in a great location.

Visit www.agentrising.com to check out Agent Rising Real Estate School and see how you can be on your way to a real estate career or sharpen your skills as a real estate agent.

Also visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com to meet our great team of BOLDIES and see how they can help you meet your real estate goals.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on October 21, 2016.

 

 MAR Conference

 

MAR Conference in Foxwoods Casino, Connecticut

                      MAR  2016 MAR Conference &                                            Tradeshow

                                         October 5 & 6, 2016
Foxwoods, CT

Join MAR at this year’s Conference & Tradeshow at the Foxwoods Resort Casino for two full days of education sessions with top national speakers. Network with fellow Realtors®, get to know vendors that can help your business and much more at the largest industry conference in New England.
Hotel Information:
Foxwoods Resort Casino

350 Trolley Line Boulevard,
Mashantucket, CT 06338-3777
1-800-369-9663

BOLD Moves Real Estate of Mattapoisett, MA will be in attendance at the conference and tradeshow.

Broker owner Kate Lanagan MacGregor of BOLD Moves along with Linda Kody  will be presenting “Seller Agency for Today and Tomorrow:  Coming Soon Upstream to a Pocket Near You”  tomorrow, Thursday at 8:30 AM.

Don’t miss this great educational opportunity. This evolving continuing education class incorporates MLSPIN guidelines, the Code of Ethics, and NAR’s Upstream initiatives into practicing real estate today.  Some of the topics include how to appropriately handle “coming soon” and exclusive listings.

Kate was excited to work with Kathy Condon and John Breault from MLSPIN and their expertise as well as Veronica McManus from RPR and Alex Lang- CEO of Upstream.  They really  provided her with a wealth of knowledge in their areas of expertise.

It’s not too late to check out the conference and put on your calendar for tomorrow’s events.  We will have more information on the conference and highlights in the days to come.

Stay tuned to www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more information and great real estate in your area.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on October 5, 2016.

 

Fall Landscaping Maintenance Tips

Landscape Maintenance Tips for the Fall Season

fall landscapeFall.  When the morning air turns crisp and cool and the leaves begin to float softly to the ground.  Not only is it my favorite season, there are many maintenance tasks to be accomplished in the landscape.  The info below includes tips on what I have found are the most important and useful tasks-  so get out there, have fun with it, and enjoy the autumn weather!

Key Dates

  • Early October:  It is a good idea to winterize your irrigation system and blow out the lines.  Many landscape maintenance companies will provide this service for less than $50, or it is pretty simple to do it yourself.
  • October 15th:  Don’t plant any grasses or perennials after this date.  Many of them won’t survive, and you will have much better luck in the spring.
  • November 1st:  Don’t plant any evergreens (especially trees) after this date.  Some deciduous trees and large deciduous shrubs can be planted later if they are balled and burlapped (B&B), but I would recommend waiting until spring when you’ll have much better success.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Prune trees and shrubs to remove dead branches or to control their size.  Fall is the best time to do this for the health of the plants.  Consider consulting with an arborist before any major pruning on trees, or at least do a little research on techniques.  When pruning shrubs, always try to maintain the natural size and growth habit of the species-  Avoid over-pruning or sculpting unnatural shapes, unless you are creating a specific look such as a hedge.  Instead of using power shears to lap off shrubs on a straight line, consider using hand pruners to thin the interior branches to maintain a healthier more natural look.
  • Remember to check soil moisture, and water if needed.  Even though you may have your irrigation system shut down for the year, fall often brings some warm, windy days that can really dry things out.  Pay special attention to anything that was just planted this year.
  • Make sure you have plenty of mulch around trees and shrubs-  this helps maintain moisture and keeps the soil from drying out over the winter.

Perennials and Ornamental Grasses

  • Prepare tender and semi-hardy perennials and shrubs for the upcoming cold winter.  I like to let a few of the fallen leaves that tend to build up around the bases of these plants remain there for the winter-  they will provide insulation around the base of the plant from the cold.  This also saves you some leaf cleanup now that you can do in the early spring.  If necessary, place additional wood mulch around the base of these plants for more insulation- pay particular attention to areas with northern exposure.
  • Leave spent stems and seed heads on grasses and perennials until spring, to enjoy their winter beauty and to provide cover for birds and wildlife.  Or, if you must have a neater look you can cut them back now, to a height of about 6-8″ off of the ground.
  • Dividing:  Some plants can be divided in the fall and replanted in other areas.  Other species don’t like the fall division/planting though, and I think that spring is a much better time to do it.  If you decide to divide, remember to water the plants well for a couple of weeks.

Lawns

  • Rake those leaves!  If left on the lawn they can smother it and cause issues such as mold and fungus.
  • Consider aerating your lawn.  Aeration allows greater movement of water, fertilizer, and air which stimulates healthy turf.  Aerating also increases the speed of decomposition of the grass clippings and enhances deep root growth.  Compacted soil especially benefits from core aerating.
  • You may want to fertilize your lawn or use a “weed and feed” type light pre-emergent herbicide in the fall for maximum growth the following spring.  Don’t over do it though, because fertilizer and herbicide can wash off of your lawn and the runoff can be harmful to water supplies and wildlife.
  • Assess the size and configuration of your lawn, and how much water you used this year to keep it green (or, brown?).   Consult with a landscape architect about how you can redesign your landscape to make it more attractive, sustainable, and functional.

Fall Weather Considerations

  • The days are getting shorter and the weather is getting cooler.  Keep an eye on the amount of precipitation we are getting-  Fall can have extremes of hot and cold, dry and wet.  Be observant.  If you have heavy rain for a couple of days then turn off the sprinklers for a week or so to compensate.  And if you have several days of warm, sunny weather then your landscape will certainly appreciate an extra drink.

Other

  • Disconnect and drain hoses, but keep a hose handy for winter watering.  I also like to wrap insulation or put insulated covers over the exterior faucets as an added protection from freeze damage (I once had a pipe freeze and break UNDER my porch, and had to take apart the porch to fix it!).
  • Collecting seed:  Stop deadheading late in the year and allow the seedheads to dry on the plant.  Then you can collect the dried seeds to plant next spring.  Store them in a cool, dark place in a container that does NOT have an airtight seal, such as an envelope (it’s also a good idea to label the container so you remember what plant it is next spring).  Another option- leave the seeds on the plants and some perennials will re-seed themselves naturally.
  • Start planning your spring bulb garden now.  Spring-blooming bulbs are planted in the fall to provide the chilling time required for spring blooms.  Remember to prepare the soil and plant bulbs at the appropriate depth listed on the package for the species.
  • Start planning for design changes to your landscape for next year.  Fall and winter are the best times to get your plans in order, and spring is the best time to install the changes-  so get ready early for next spring, because it will be here before you know it!
  • Take a break and toss the football around.  Afterward, enjoy some warm apple cider with cinnamon.  Finally, rake your leaves into a giant pile and take turns jumping into them with the neighbor kids!

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for all your real estate needs.  We have our own home stager, Laura Severino, who can help stage your home and help your house sell faster.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on September 21, 2016.

Landscaping and Watering

landscaping and wateringSummer is an especially important time to save water. Outdoor water use increases residential consumption from 10% to 50% in June, July and August.  This summer has been a particularly difficult year with significantly less than average rainfall and the need to water more frequently.  Every drop counts to keep your landscaping alive and flourishing.

TIMING IS CRITICAL!

Watering your lawn mid-day will result in a high rate of evaporation and sunburned grass. Roots can maintain plenty of moisture even after several days without rain. Before watering, look for signs that it’s needed: patchy areas, a general change in color or footprints that remain in the grass long after being made.

Frequent light watering can actually weaken your lawn by encouraging shallow roots that are less tolerant of dry periods and more susceptible to insect damage. Wet grass can also burn in the hot sun and is vulnerable to disease from mildew and fungus. Test your soil for dryness by digging your finger below the surface of the soil. Water only when the soil is dry to a depth of 1 1/2 inches. When watering, check to see that water soaks down 3-4 inches. This encourages deep root growth.

GIVE YOUR LAWN A REST

If your lawn “fades” in the summer, don’t panic. Grass becomes naturally dormant during hot, dry periods. It will revive quickly after a good rainfall or when the weather turns cooler.

  • Water very early in the morning.
  • Never water when it’s windy, rainy or very hot.
  • Raise the blade level of your mower to 2 -3 inches or more. Longer grass retains more moisture because it shades the roots. It encourages deeper rooting, requires less fertilizer and competes better against weeds.
  • Never water faster than the soil can absorb it. Avoid puddling and run-off.
  • Be sure your hose has a shut-off nozzle. Hoses without a nozzle can spout 10 gallons or more per minute.
  • If you have an automatic sprinkler system, make sure the timer or “controller” is set to water each landscape zone efficiently. Program the controller to operate according to the watering needs of your lawn or garden. Better still, install a rain sensor or soil moisture sensor that turns the system off if it’s raining or if moisture is present in the soil.
  • Do not apply fertilizer in the summer – new growth requires more water. Apply in early spring and or fall.
  • Aerate your soil in April, September or October to aid water absorption and retention.

PLAN AND DESIGN YOUR GARDEN FOR EFFICIENT WATERING

Be aware of the various zones in your yard (hot/sunny, cool/shady, moist, dry, etc.) and plan your gardens and plantings accordingly. For example, if your have a hot, dry zone, carefully select plants that can endure hot, dry conditions.

CLUSTER PLANTS THAT NEED EXTRA CARE

If you choose shrubs, flowers or vegetables that need lots of sun and moisture, place them near each other. You’ll save time and water by watering just one area of your yard.

MULCH TO KEEP ROOTS MOIST

Mulch can serve as a ground cover that reduces water evaporation from the soil and reduces the number of weeds that would otherwise compete with the plant for available soil moisture.

Mulch flowers, shrub beds and trees with pine bark mulch. In your vegetable beds, use salt marsh hay, newspaper (no color pages), black plastic, or better yet, landscape fabric – that allows water to penetrate the fabric but keeps down weed growth. On a sweltering 100° day, a 3-inch mulch can keep the soil underneath up to 25° cooler! Avoid white marble chips that can damage acid-loving plants like rhododendrons. Stones or pebbles are good on shady areas. They shouldn’t be used near the house because they give off too much heat. Ground covers, such as ivy or pachysandra, also prevent evaporation around established shrubs and ornamental trees

.You can’t control the weather but you can do  your part to make the most of the water available to help keep your  landscaping alive.

Visit www.agentrising.com for more useful tips to pass on to your real estate clients or to start your real estate career with Agent Rising Real Estate School.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on August 12, 2016.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com  for great real estate in your community.

Fieldstone Farm Market in Marion Update

Here is the latest update for Fieldstone Farm Market of Marion.  The foundation has been poured and Arne Johnson, owner, is hoping to see the walls start to go up next week.  There is lots of activity at the site of the former Frigate Restaurant on Rt. 6.

The fruit and vegetable market will have fresh produce with an emphasis on fresh and local.  Having worked in the local produce field for many years, Arne has lots of experience in bringing the best possible fruits and vegetables to the community.

There will also be an ice cream window with local flavors.  Look for the fall opening of Fieldstone Farm Market and more updates as construction continues.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com  and www.fieldstonefarmmarket.com for more updates as construction continues.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on June 1, 2016.

Agent Rising Real Estate School Gratitude

Agent Rising Real Estate School

Agent Rising Real Estate School just finished their 4 Day Intensive Training for aspiring Real Estate Agents and Brokers.  The class was a huge success and a testimonial to Kate Lanagan MacGregor and her team at BBM.

Margot Stone attended the class last week.  She already is a real estate agent but wanted a refresher course  to become immersed in real estate again.  Here is her sweet testimonial along with a picture of the beautiful flowers she presented to Kate and Marie.

Dear Kate and Marie,

         I want to reiterate my gratitude for providing me with such a positive experience last week at your Agent Rising Real Estate School.  You supported and helped me in so many ways! Not only did you teach me a great deal, but you also allowed me to reach my goals and get back into real estate.    I am so appreciative of the time, energy, kindness and spirit that you devoted to all of us.  I feel as if I have made two special friends!

         Fondly and gratefully,

             Margot

Agent Rising Real Estate School is truly a unique and individualized setting to help you achieve your real estate goals whether it involves becoming a real estate agent or helping you achieve your goals to better your real estate career.

Visit www.agentrising.com for more information on how we can help you.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on January 21, 2016.

Family Friendly Kitchens

kitchens

A lively forum for all things real estate

5 Kitchens that Families Love

The kitchen is the hub of the home. It’s where we gather to swap stories over a stove-top meal or gab near the gravy. What goes into a good kitchen, though? Which features, layouts, and touches make a kitchen more than just a room to cook in, but a place that is identifiable with our family as the gathering place? Here are some ways to make your kitchen loved by all its family.

The Island

A kitchen island truly is a remarkable feature in any family kitchen. It offers extra counter space for larger meals, and it also has potential to expand the storage space of a kitchen. The island serves as a space for serving from. If the design allows, barstools can be added here or there for a few extra seats. The island is an especially handy add-on for smaller kitchens where the cabinetry is lacking and can be customized fairly easily to fit your storage needs.

French Doors to the Outdoors

A kitchen that can open up and expand to the outdoors in an excellent feature for any family, especially one that entertains. A set of french doors or a sliding door offer easy access to other family cooking favorites: the grill and the smoker. Also, extra seating could be footsteps away in the form of a patio table. Keeping the food in the kitchen or on the deck offers easier clean-up. It also gives a safer place for spills for the little ones during large gatherings, rather than scrubbing juice from the living room carpet.

Furniture as a Built-in

When the kitchen table is included in the kitchen, it makes dining and serving a cinch. Imagine what once was a breakfast bar is expanded into a countertop. This is usually part of a center island that can seat up to six people. This feature is great for a busy family, streamlining serving and clean-up into a single room. We also see this concept in the breakfast nook, with built-in seating and an opportunity for decorative flair with cushions and pillows.

The Hide-Away Concept

Fewer visual surrounding can sometimes help our thinking. This is where the hide-away concept comes in. Everything from mixers and coffee stations to microwaves and toaster ovens can be hidden away in their own little cubbies. Once the appliance is used, the custom-made door can shut to hide it away again, never again to clutter up our countertops or our thought process. This concept can also be used to store cleaning supplies and expand the pantry. Often times, custom built-ins on castor wheels can make a world of difference for storage expansion. They can be camouflaged in, used when needed, and hidden away again!

Kitchen Zones

With everything in its own specific area, organization happens naturally. Think dishwashing station, eating station, cooking station, etc. The kitchen has everything tailored to be in the exact spot where it is needed, to be easily accessed. For example, everyday dishes are kept directly above the dishwasher, next to the sink, and within reach of drying towels to make up the dishwashing zone.

Keeping the kitchen clean and functional, yet still inviting, can be a challenge. With these tips for customization, your perfect family kitchen is just steps away.

Visit www.agentrising.com for more real estate news and agent tips.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on December 30, 2015.

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